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  • Trap
  • Skeet
  • Sporting
  • Olympic


Sporting

The 'Sporting' discipline probably has the biggest following in Ireland and while the other disciplines only use standard targets, in Sporting almost anything goes!

This discipline is sometimes referred to as 'English Sporting' and can have an infinite variety of 'stands'. A course or competition will feature a given number of stands each of which has a predetermined number of targets, all travelling along the same path and speed, either as singles or doubles. Each stand will feature a different type of target i.e. crosser, driven, quartering etc.


Clay Target Shooting

This tremendously enjoyable pastime enjoys great popularity in Ireland. A beguiling and enticing sport, with purpose built layouts, offering all the thrills of game shooting, and a truly exceptional simulation with moving targets and first rate firearms amid the most sweeping, natural rural settings.

Develop your concentration, reflexes, accuracy and sense of timing, with the highest standards of international safety, and tutorship, which will delight the beginner or most ardent connoisseur of the game. Become a brilliant shot and enjoy the holiday of a lifetime in Ireland.


Trap

In 'trap', targets are thrown either as singles or doubles from one or more 'traps' (the machine used to launch the target).

Down the line

Also known as DTL, is a popular clay shooting discipline. Targets are thrown to a distance of 45 to 50 metres at a fixed height of approximately 2.75m and with a horizontal 'spread' of up to 22 degrees either side of the centre line.

Olympic Trap

A trench built beneath ground level in front of the shooting stands conceals 15 traps arranged in 5 groups of 3. Shooters take turns to shoot at a target each, before moving in a clockwise direction to the next stand in the line.


Skeet

Skeet is a word of Scandinavian origin, though the discipline originated in America. Targets are thrown in singles and doubles from 2 trap houses situated some 40 metres apart at opposite ends of a semicircular arc on which there are seven shooting positions.

National Skeet

The gun position is optional (i.e. pre-mounted or out-of-shoulder when the target is called) and the targets are released immediately upon the shooter's call.


Sporting

The 'Sporting' discipline probably has the biggest following in Ireland and while the other disciplines only use standard targets, in Sporting almost anything goes!

Sporting

This discipline is sometimes referred to as 'English Sporting' and can have an infinite variety of 'stands'. A course or competition will feature a given number of stands each of which has a predetermined number of targets, all travelling along the same path and speed, either as singles or doubles. Each stand will feature a different type of target i.e. crosser, driven, quartering etc.


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Olympic Trap

A trench built beneath ground level in front of the shooting stands conceals 15 traps arranged in 5 groups of 3. Shooters take turns to shoot at a target each, before moving in a clockwise direction to the next stand in the line.

Olympic Skeet

The targets travel at a considerably faster speed, the release of the target can be delayed up to 3 seconds after calling and the gun-down position is compulsory. There is also an eighth shooting station which is situated midway between the two trap houses.